8/08/2011

08-08-11 - Vets are Assholes

Some people seem to have a failure to grasp what is reasonable behavior and what is reasonable to nag about.

I've complained about my current landlord before, who just has no concept about what normal wear and tear by a renter is like. I fucking mow and weed and water and repair shit and oil the counters and all this shit, and yet they send me monthly pesters like "I drove by and the grass was looking a little tall, better get out there and trim it" ; or "it might freeze tonight, better wrap all the outside faucets" ; WTF , do you have any clue what bad renters do to houses? I'm not lighting the house on fire. I'm not turning on the water and letting it run (when the owner pays the utilities), I'm not selling crack out of the house, you should be fucking happy.

One of the more unfortunate bosses I ever had was on the IEEE board for code style guidelines (that's got to be a major red flag right there). I'm all for some level of code uniformity and cleanliness, but he would literally review every checkin I made each night and send me a mail with things like "variables at line 97 aren't lined up in the same column; there's a blank line on 416 that should be deleted" ... are you kidding me? The code is basically so clean compared to the spaghetti mess it could be; there's this failure to grasp minor transgressions.

Vets seem to consistently suffer from this problem.

Every time I have to take my cats in to the vet, I get some kind of condescending lecture from an asshole vet.

Back in CA I got a long lecture about how I shouldn't let my cats run around outside because they get diseases and injuries and so on. Okay, mister vet, I'm sure that's true for humans too, so why don't you just stay in your house and never leave and then we won't have to deal with your uptight ass.

I also got a lecture about putting the food too close to the litter. Which, hey actually is a bad thing to do, and I didn't know it, so it's good that I learned, but the vet never tells you things in the style of "oh, yeah, you might not know this and here's a tip" , it's always like "you are a rotten human being who is intentionally abusing your animals".

With Chi Chi here we always get a lecture about how she was declawed. Well fuck you vet, we didn't do it, we adopted an adult cat from a shelter that was previously declawed, so nyah.

This last time we got a lecture about how fat she is. Yeah she's slightly over weight, but she's not one of those ultra-obese cats that owners actually should be lectured about.


I wrote this a month ago but didn't post it, because it's just whiney and boring and I'm trying to avoid posting things like that (I write a lot of shit that I don't post, despite how it may seem, this blog is not a direct stream of defecation from the anus of my mind; when I'm being wise I don't hit "publish" right after I write something, and 99% of the time when I revisit it a few hours later I decide it should go in the bin).

But recent events have reminded me of it so I dug it back up.

We went backpacking recently, so I was reading lots of hiking books, and I have to say - "The Mountaineers" are assholes. Every single hike description is a fucking diatribe against trail users that they don't approve of. It's not once in a while, it's every single fucking description, they just can't resist being snarky and nasty on every page. It's so bad that I can barely stand to read the books despite them being clearly the best reference material.

And it's the same kind of out of touch ranting. There are plenty of very obvious bad trail users that deserve to be complained about - people who leave trash in the wilderness is probably the worst one, people who bring up boom boxes or dogs in no-dogs-allowed areas, people who trample the flowers off trail, etc. But that's not what The Mountaineers complain about. The things they complain about are :


People who camp near lakes (because it's too high use)

People who have camp fires (even in allowed fire places) ; (they mock us as "kumbayah-ers")

People who only backpack one or two nights (you're scum if you don't get into deep wilderness)

People who want a road that takes them to easy access

etc.

it's like so fucking out of touch with what is actually a sin on the trail.

7 comments:

Aaron said...

I wonder if Vets are exposed to super-terrible pet owners all the time or something.

cbloom said...

Yeah, I'm sure, it must be a really excruciating job in some ways, sick animals in cages yapping at each other, horrible owners, and cheap-skates that don't want to pay for proper care, etc.

I'm sure it's the typical thing where they see really rotten owners and want to tell them off, but because of the standard social pussyness they don't really get to lay into the asshole, so they compensate by letting out their anger over time and being generally pissy to everyone.

jfb said...

For letters about mowing your lawn, invest in a paper shredder...

As for books, always remember before getting bothered to consider who is likely to have both the time and the desire to write one about the topic you're reading. It's a very biased sample if you take it to be representative of people who enjoy the hobby.... A lot of the world becomes simpler when you realize that people writing aren't necessarily the people in the world doing...

I'm a bit confused why you'd read a book on hiking though. Just go... More than any book, you can find good information from ordinary people on the Internet as well, Whiteblaze.net etc... Nothing special about "authors" unless you feel awe at the blessing of a publishing company...

cbloom said...

"I'm a bit confused why you'd read a book on hiking though. Just go..."

Seriously, you're confused? So, what do you suggest, I walk out my door and just keep heading towards the mountains until I see a trail head? (or, not seeing a trail head, I find myself surrounded by woods)

IMO the internet is still a *much* worse place for hiking information than books. The best site for around here is WTA, but it's just a mess of too much information. There are thousands of hikes and hundreds of reports on each hike (or so it seems), it takes forever to weed through that and it's just exhausting. The value that a book provides is to narrow down the choices to the best few and to provide editorial information.

This could be a more general rant, but I find "crowd-sourced" information like trail reports to be total shit. It would only be good if we had proper social search (eg. see "the network of trust"). What I need is a way to say "show me the hikes that people I trust say are good".

The thing is, good old fashioned books let you do that just fine - you find an author you like and blammo there you go - lots of information that you can rely on.

The annoying thing about The Mountaineers sourness is that otherwise the books are really excellent (though they are getting out of date now since the main guys are either ancient or dead).

jfb said...

"So, what do you suggest, I walk out my door and just keep heading towards the mountains until I see a trail head?"

Pretty much. You can use Google to find where the trail head is, then go there...

"There are thousands of hikes and hundreds of reports on each hike (or so it seems), it takes forever to weed through that and it's just exhausting."

Instead of exhausting yourself, you could just pick one and try it. If it's a good experience, it'll be a good experience... if it's a bad experience, it'll be an adventure.

Really, this current rant seems to be listing conflicts between two people trying to outdo each other on their obsessions with control... Maybe mow and weed and water less and spend the time doing something you actually want to do. :)

By the way, I've really appreciated your threading posts. I'm doing an embedded project (ARM Cortex M3) which has some operating system-like aspects, so these have been very helpful. The ticket lock for instance, dead simple but not (to me anyway) obvious, I'm using them now..

cbloom said...

"Pretty much. You can use Google to find where the trail head is, then go there...

Instead of exhausting yourself, you could just pick one and try it. If it's a good experience, it'll be a good experience... if it's a bad experience, it'll be an adventure."

That all sounds very good and light hearted and positive, but in reality it's just the definition of bad decision making.

The most probable result is that you drive many hours, wind up a trail that sucks for some reason or other (for example in WA at the moment, random trail selection is highly likely to stick you in deep snow), and you wind up wasting one of the very few good days we get around here.

I don't believe that you actually go hiking (in high mountains, on long hikes), because I don't think any hiker would suggest what you are suggesting. In fact what you're suggesting is foolishly dangerous and goes against all hiking safety advice; in particular when attempting a loop you need to know the length and difficulty of it to make sure you don't get caught out. It's also important to know how much water you need and whether there's a reliable water source on the trail.

I've done plenty of spontaneous rambles in my life where I just randomly drive somewhere and walk around a bit. In fact I imagine I've done it more than any of my readers, I quite enjoy to just look at a map and stick my finger on it and go there. But that is an entirely different activity.

cbloom said...

I'm trying to complain about The Mountaineers and you tell me not to read books? That is not the way it's supposed to go.

This is not "cbloom posts ill-conceived things and has his basic life decisions questioned" it's "cbloom rants".

Perhaps you've been misled by all the moderate/reasonable technical posts, but we're back to crazy town now!

old rants